Frequently Asked Questions

Kids' nightstands, toy boxes, bed frames, bookcases, dressers, desks, and more are all available in one place allowing you to furnish your kids' room quickly and easily. There is a variety of different types of furniture for kids of all ages.

We show them videotape of Ti Soeur's scars. The first step is to add the number together. The translator explains, "If she doesn't go and pick up the water, they beat her up.

Our wide selection of kid’s Bibles include illustrated Bibles, Bible storybooks, NIV Bibles, traditional KJV and more! Hear about sales, receive special offers & more. You can unsubscribe at any time.
Buyers choose which items to buy based on style, condition, and inventory needs. We look for items in like-new condition and current style. Kid to Kid software prices the items and determines your payment. This process typically takes minutes, but since this can vary throughout the day, you will receive a wait-time estimate up front.
Kids' nightstands, toy boxes, bed frames, bookcases, dressers, desks, and more are all available in one place allowing you to furnish your kids' room quickly and easily. There is a variety of different types of furniture for kids of all ages.
Parents who sell their children to the Landover Baptist Ministry may not contact their child or retain legal guardianship of their child after the forms are signed by our judges. If you have any doubts about selling your child, or any legal questions, a Landover Baptist Lawyer will be on hand during the transaction to .
Parents who sell their children to the Landover Baptist Ministry may not contact their child or retain legal guardianship of their child after the forms are signed by our judges. If you have any doubts about selling your child, or any legal questions, a Landover Baptist Lawyer will be on hand during the transaction to .

Our wide selection of kid’s Bibles include illustrated Bibles, Bible storybooks, NIV Bibles, traditional KJV and more! Hear about sales, receive special offers & more. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Poor families from the countryside would give their children to wealthy families in the city. The children would do domestic work, but they would also be fed, clothed and educated. It was a sort of social compact. Even though the system has now morphed into something grotesque, traffickers exploit the false, residual glow of altruism.

This bogus sheen of charity is perhaps why we are able to get slave owners to talk to us on camera. Perhaps it's also because having a slave is so commonplace as to be almost entirely uncontroversial here. We meet Onita Aristide in a shantytown precariously perched over a ravine filled with trash and also wild pigs and goats.

Aristide is a mother of two who sells sandals in the local market. For four months she's owned a "restavek" nicknamed Ti Soeur Creole for "little sister. She sleeps on the floor of Onita Aristide's tiny home. There are a bunch of hard questions I want to ask this woman, for example, why doesn't she send the girl to school?

But the scars on Ti Soeur's arms suggest I should tread lightly. Knowing Aristide doesn't speak any English, I broach the topic with our translator. Do you think I'm correct? We follow Ti Soeur as she goes to fetch water from the communal well. This gives us a chance to ask her questions without her owners hearing. She's a bright-eyed year-old with short hair. When I ask her questions about the marks on her arm, she says, "The lady did it to me with an electric wire.

As I later learn, this appears to be a standard punishment -- whipping restaveks with the sort of electric cord you might you use to plug in a toaster or a laptop. The translator explains, "If she doesn't go and pick up the water, they beat her up. If she doesn't sweep, beat her up. By the time we visit Ti Soeur at 10 a. After meeting Ti Souer, we decided to go find her parents, to get a sense of why they would give their child away. Following a lead, we drive out of the throbbing, chaotic city, hours away, into the lush countryside.

It's beautiful out here. We see clouds resting lazily in green valleys. We see women on their way to market, carrying impossibly large loads of goods on their heads. But you can't miss the deprivation: Haiti is the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere -- the result of decades of bad, brutal, kleptocratic leadership, and also, many believe, negative interference from outside powers, including the United States.

Haiti's poverty is on full display as we pull up to the house where Ti Soeur's mother lives. It's a shack, housing three families. Nine children live here, including one who we see using a condom as a toy balloon. Ti Soeur's mother is named Lita Bellevue. After a few pleasantries, I ask her the obvious question. She tells us that Ti Soeur's birth father is dead. Her new husband, who is abusive, forced her to give the child away, she says, because they are too poor to take care of her. However, the husband does not seem willing to part with the two young children he and Lita have had together.

Lita says she's heard rumors that Ti Soeur is being abused by her owners. To help us better understand why parents make these sorts of decisions, we go see Jean-Etienne Charles, a local Pentecostal pastor who preaches against child slavery.

He's got a broad, happy face and a thriving church, complete with a school for local kids. But because they think that they cannot take care of them, they turn them to another person. As a sign of how deeply entrenched this practice is, it turns out that the pastor's family has a girl living with them whom they took on to do domestic work.

They have since legally adopted her and are putting her through school, as an example to the families who abuse child slaves. Now that we've learned that Ti Soeur is stuck between slavery and an abusive, unhappy home, we decide to try our luck with the Haitian government.

We go to the Department of Social Services and meet with several senior officials. We show them videotape of Ti Soeur's scars. She promises to act as early as possible.

We leave feeling confident that Ti Soeur's fate may soon change. But within days, government officials stop returning our phone calls, and Ti Soeur's case takes some surprising turns. We learn that Bellevue, Ti Soeur's mother, has done something brave and extraordinary: With the government seemingly missing in action, we hook up with a social services organization affiliated with the American-based group Beyond Borders. They work with mother and daughter, reunited as a result of Bellevue's courageous insistence, to get Ti Soeur accepted into a clean, cheerful orphanage.

Her mother is being kicked out of her house, for the crime of having spoken out to her husband. Rather than take Ti Soeur with her into an uncertain, and potentially homeless future, she decided to leave her at the orphanage, where she's safe. As they're forced to part again, it's a wrenching scene. Ti Soeur is sobbing.

She throws herself on the ground, inconsolable. As we leave her, Ti Soeur seems traumatized, confused and lonely. But she's also, finally, in a place where she'll be fed, educated, safe and free from slavery. For Haiti's child slaves, this may be as close to a happy ending as you'll find. Harvard Kennedy School panel on democracy and the press Cold front brings rain from Texas to the Northeast: A band greets the flight.

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We are all God's people, even if we are of lesser value to Him because of our sex or race. Please note that the pricing table below reflects current rates as of January 17, It's as easy as pie! Since each child we purchase is part of an effort to develop the Landover Baptist "Young Christian Soldier" Outreach Ministry, the little boy or girl is actually a living, breathing, tax write-off for as long as he or she lives.

The United States Government and taxpaying citizens take care of every single expense we incur as a result of our tax-deductible purchase of your child. It's a win-win situation for our ministry, and a terrific way of training up young champions for Christ using the tax-dollars of American citizens. Frankly, we don't intend to stop purchasing children until Jesus comes back.

Each child we purchase starts working right away on building house cages and latrines for even more children that arrive by the trainload every single week! Over 1, desperate families in Iowa have already sold their children to us, and we need more! All children except for a few colored children selected to enter the Landover Baptist Sanitation Ministry will be shipped off to North Dakota to our Young Christian Soldier missionary training camp.

When they turn 13, they are old enough to live on their own in a hostile, foreign country. We ship them off to Africa with a KJV Bible and a box of pre-addressed tithing envelopes to pass out to the locals. What an opportunity to get back on your feet and get the financial help you so desperately need! Creation Science teaches us that once a child is away from the home for more than 3 months, parents will just forget about them. We don't care if you are unsaved or saved, we just care about your children and the chance to help them become Champions for Christ.

If you are considering selling your child to our church, contact our Christian Soldier Ministry immediately!

I'm off to see how long it takes to buy a child slave. Click HERE to learn more about what you can do to help end child slavery. It's 45 minutes to Kennedy Airport and an hour or so wait in the terminal, then a 3½-hour flight to Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Parents who sell their children to the Landover Baptist Ministry may not contact their child or retain legal guardianship of their child after the forms are signed by our judges. If you have any doubts about selling your child, or any legal questions, a Landover Baptist Lawyer will be on hand during the transaction to . Buyers choose which items to buy based on style, condition, and inventory needs. We look for items in like-new condition and current style. Kid to Kid software prices the items and determines your payment. This process typically takes minutes, but since this can vary throughout the day, you will receive a wait-time estimate up front.